Spaceship Collaborative and Culinary Culture: Let the community decide

I couldn’t be prouder of my cousins Jacob and Mischa DeHart, whose Spaceship Collaborative recently launched the Culinary Culture site. Here’s a Chicago Magazine profile of them.

Jacob’s company, Threadless.com, pioneered the idea of creating an online community that organically determines the nature of the site and the revenue streams.

I was thinking about this yesterday when my husband, George, went to 5 stores trying to find an inflatable tube for sledding. “Oh, we’re a camping store.” “Oh, we only sell hard sleds and saucers.” Five retail stores, all hurting for business in this economy, all narrowly defining themselves according to what they want to be instead of what people are asking for. It’s Wisconsin. It’s winter. The tubes are easier on your spine if you’re over 40 and joining in the fun on the sledding hill. Why not take a cue from the customers?

Authors and publishers also have to take a cue from the customers. If people find it daunting to buy a book that presents material in one form, then why dig your heels in and say, “Well, that’s what a book is. If you don’t like it, well, that’s your problem.”?

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2 Comments

Filed under listen to the customer

2 responses to “Spaceship Collaborative and Culinary Culture: Let the community decide

  1. Hi, Nancy:

    You open an old memory. When I was a kid tires had tubes–no snide comment please. Tubes with too many patches were thrown out for the kids; adults also joined in the sledding fun–no cost. If you ask around maybe an old timer still has one tucked away in the attic or basement. Also check a used tire shops.
    Love,
    Adolphus

  2. Nancy

    I never could figure out how those kids got the inner tubes–I was so jealous of the ones who floated on the big tractor tubes at Lake Geneva. On the snow, we used plastic sheets called “mini boggins” and relied on my brother, the future engineer, to slide down the wooded ravine a few times creating a sledding trail that didn’t lead straight into a tree!
    The good old days!

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